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Patient Educ Couns. 2010 May;79(2):152-5. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.09.004. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

Motivation to quit smoking among parents of urban children with asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. jill_halterman@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify factors associated with motivation to quit smoking among parents of urban children with asthma.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from parents who smoke and had a child enrolled in the School-Based Asthma Therapy (SBAT) trial. We assessed asthma symptoms, children's cotinine, and parent smoking behaviors. Motivation to quit smoking was assessed by a 10-point continuous measure (1, not at all motivated; 10, very motivated).

RESULTS:

209 parents smoked (39% of sample), and children's mean cotinine was 2.48 ng/ml. Motivation to quit was on average 6.9, and 47% of parents scored >or=8 on the scale. Parents who believed their child's asthma was not under good control, and parents who strongly agreed their child's asthma symptoms would decrease if they stop smoking had higher motivation to quit compared to their counterparts (p<.05). In a multivariate analysis, parents who believed their child's asthma was not under control had more than twice the odds of reporting high motivation to quit.

CONCLUSION:

Parents' perception of the risks of smoking to their child with asthma is associated with motivation to quit.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Raising awareness about the effect of smoking and quitting on children's asthma might increase motivation to quit among parents.

Comment in

PMID:
19796913
PMCID:
PMC2856779
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2009.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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