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Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2009 Oct-Dec;15(4):239-43. doi: 10.4103/1319-3767.56099.

Irritable bowel syndrome in a Bangladeshi urban community: prevalence and health care seeking pattern.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, BIHS Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. irinperveen@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Although irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, its prevalence is unknown, especially in the urban population of Bangladesh. This community-based study aimed to find out the prevalence of IBS and healthcare-seeking patterns using the Rome-II definition.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A population-based cross-sectional survey of 1503 persons aged 15 years and above was carried out in an urban community of Bangladesh. The subjects were interviewed using a valid questionnaire based on Rome-II criteria in a home setting. Statistical analysis was performed with Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) Programmers and the level of significance was set at P <or= 0.05.

RESULTS:

A response rate of 97.2% yielded 1503 questionnaires for analysis. The prevalence of IBS was found to be 7.7% (n = 116) with a male to female ratio of 1:1.36 (49 vs. 67). "Diarrhoea-predominant IBS" (50%, n = 58) was the predominant IBS subgroup. Symptoms of abdominal pain associated with a change in stool frequency (100%) and consistency (88.8%) were quite common. All IBS symptoms were more prevalent among women (P < 0.000). In the past one year, 65.5% (n = 76) IBS subjects had consulted a physician with a slightly higher rate of women consulters (68.6 vs. 61.2%). The main predictor for healthcare-seeking was the presence of multiple dyspeptic symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of IBS in the urban community was found to be similar to that in rural communities. A higher rate of consultation was found among urban IBS subjects than in the rural subjects, with sex not seen to be a discriminator to seek consultation.

PMID:
19794269
PMCID:
PMC2981840
DOI:
10.4103/1319-3767.56099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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