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Eur J Ophthalmol. 2009 Sep-Oct;19(5):883-6.

Massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage in a patient with chronic renal failure and coronary artery disease treated with Plavix.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Cardinale Ascalesi Hospital-ASLNA1, Napoli - Italy. roccodemarco@tin.it

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report a case of massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage in a patient with chronic renal failure and coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix).

METHODS:

Case report.

RESULTS:

A 75-year-old man presented with pain and loss of vision in the left eye for 1 week. His medical history was remarkable for systemic hypertension, chronic renal failure, and artery coronary disease. For 6 months, he had been taking 75 mg/day of Plavix after coronary angioplasty. Ocular examination revealed the patient to be in angle closure. Ultrasonography and computed tomography scan revealed a massive choroidal hemorrhage pushing the iris-lens diaphragm forward. Pain and intraocular pressure were treated successfully with evacuative sclerotomies, but the final exitus after 6 months was bulbar phthisis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage is an extremely rare event that usually has been described in older patients (65-87 years old) receiving anticoagulants or thrombolytic agents. Systemic hypertension, generalized atherosclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration are additional risk factors. In the present case, massive choroidal hemorrhage was associated with use of clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix) in a patient with chronic renal failure. Our report indicates that Plavix should be administered with caution in patients with chronic renal failure owing to the risk of serious choroidal bleeding. Chronic renal failure should be also included in the list of risk factors for massive spontaneous choroidal hemorrhage. Evacuative sclerotomies may have value in the relief of pain and elevated intraocular pressure but has not been shown to be beneficial in visual and anatomic outcomes.

PMID:
19787616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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