Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Drug Policy. 2010 May;21(3):240-3. doi: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2009.08.006. Epub 2009 Sep 25.

Differences in alcohol-related mortality between foreign-born and native-born Spaniards.

Author information

1
Institute for Alcohol and Drug Studies, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alcohol consumption is associated with high rates of mortality. This study aimed to analyse mortality attributable to alcohol consumption in foreign-born and native-born Spaniards in 2004 and to determine whether differences existed between these groups.

METHODS:

The number of deaths attributable to alcohol consumption was calculated by means of the alcohol-attributable fractions devised by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention for calculating mortality rates in the USA. Alcohol-related mortality rates and age-adjusted mortality rates per 100,000 persons (using European standard population) were calculated by gender.

RESULTS:

The mortality rates attributable to alcohol per 100,000 inhabitants were lower among foreign-born Spaniards (7.0) than native-born Spaniards (16.7). Chronic conditions accounted for only 23.6% of all alcohol-related mortality for foreign-born Spaniards, but 60% for native-born Spaniards. The former were much more likely to suffer unintentional injuries, particularly road traffic accidents, while the latter showed high rates of alcohol-related death for digestive diseases, cardiovascular disorders, intentional injuries and malignant neoplasm.

CONCLUSION:

Alcohol consumption is an important cause of death among the native-born Spanish population. The observed differences in alcohol-related mortality between native and foreign-born Spaniards should be considered when developing targeted harm reduction policies.

PMID:
19782553
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugpo.2009.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center