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Atherosclerosis. 2010 Mar;209(1):131-5. doi: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.08.025. Epub 2009 Aug 21.

Thoracic aorta calcification detected by electron beam tomography predicts all-cause mortality.

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1
Lipid Clinic Heart Institute - InCor, University of Sao Paulo Medical School Hospital, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The presence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an independent marker of increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality. However, the predictive value of thoracic aorta calcification (TAC), which can be additionally identified without further scanning during assessment of CAC, is unknown.

METHODS:

We followed a cohort of 8401 asymptomatic individuals (mean age: 53+/-10 years, 69% men) undergoing cardiac risk factor evaluation and TAC and CAC testing with electron beam computed tomography. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed to predict all-cause mortality based on the presence of TAC.

RESULTS:

During a median follow-up period of 5 years, 124 (1.5%) deaths were observed. Overall survival was 96.9% and 98.9% for those with and without detectable TAC, respectively (p<0.0001). Compared to those with no TAC, the hazard ratio for mortality in the presence of TAC was 3.25 (95% CI: 2.28-4.65, p<0.0001) in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking and family history of premature coronary artery disease, and presence of CAC the relationship remained robust (HR 1.61, 95% CI: 1.10-2.27, p=0.015). Likelihood ratio chi(2) statistics demonstrated that the addition of TAC contributed significantly in predicting mortality to traditional risk factors alone (chi(2)=13.62, p=0.002) as well as risk factors+CAC (chi(2)=5.84, p=0.02) models.

CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, the presence of TAC was associated with all-cause mortality in our study; this relationship was independent of conventional CVD risk factors as well as the presence of CAC.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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