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Psychiatry Res. 2009 Oct 30;174(1):57-61. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2009.03.005. Epub 2009 Sep 24.

Corpus callosum volume in children with autism.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. hardanay@stanford.edu

Abstract

The corpus callosum (CC) is the main commissure connecting the cerebral hemispheres. Previous evidence suggests the involvement of the CC in the pathophysiology of autism. However, most studies examined the mid-sagittal area and investigations applying novel methods are warranted. The goal of this investigation is to apply a volumetric method to examine the size of the CC in autism and to identify any association with clinical features. An MRI-based morphometric study of the total CC volume and its seven subdivisions was conducted and involved 22 children with autism (age range 8.1-12.7 years) and 23 healthy, age-matched controls. Reductions in the total volume of the CC and several of its subdivisions were found in the autism sample. Associations were observed between CC structures and clinical features including social deficits, repetitive behaviors, and sensory abnormalities. Volumetric alterations of the CC observed in this investigation are consistent with midsagittal area tracings of decreased CC size in autism. These findings support the aberrant connectivity hypothesis with possible decrease in interhemispheric communications.

PMID:
19781917
PMCID:
PMC2761427
DOI:
10.1016/j.pscychresns.2009.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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