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Agri. 2009 Jul;21(3):95-103.

The efficacy of topical thiocolchicoside (Muscoril) in the treatment of acute cervical myofascial pain syndrome: a single-blind, randomized, prospective, phase IV clinical study.

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1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Istanbul University, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey. DrAysegulKetenci@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Myofascial pain syndrome is a disorder characterized by hypersensitive sites called trigger points at one or more muscles and/or connective tissue, leading to pain, muscle spasm, sensitivity, rigor, limitation of movement, weakness, and rarely, autonomic dysfunction. Various treatment methods have been used in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. Among these, stretch and spray technique, trigger point injection, dry needling, pharmacological agents, and physical therapy modalities have been proven effective.

METHODS:

Sixty-five patients with acute myofascial pain syndrome were recruited into the study. Patients were randomized into three groups. The first group received thiocolchicoside ointment onto the trigger points, the second group received 8 mg thiocolchicoside intramuscular injection to the trigger points, and the third group received both treatments. Treatment was applied for 5 consecutive days. Algometric and goniometric measurements and pain severity assessments with visual analog scale (VAS) were repeated on the first, third, and fifth days of the treatment.

RESULTS:

Pain severity measured with VAS significantly improved after the first day in the mono-therapy groups and after the third day in all groups. While significant improvement was observed in all three groups in right lateral flexion measurements, no significant changes were observed in the combined treatment group in left lateral flexion measurements.

CONCLUSION:

Thiocolchicoside can be used in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The ointment form may be a good alternative, particularly in patients who cannot receive injections.

PMID:
19780000
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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