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Eur Surg Res. 2009;43(4):330-7. doi: 10.1159/000237747. Epub 2009 Sep 16.

Comparison of the effects of low intra-abdominal pressure and pentoxifylline on oxidative stress during CO2 pneumoperitoneum in rabbits.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. tihomir.adam@zg.htnet.hr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-pressure pneumoperitoneum and pentoxifylline, a methylxanthine derivative, in the prevention of injury caused by free oxygen radicals generated during CO(2 )pneumoperitoneum.

METHODS:

Twenty-eight rabbits were allocated randomly to 4 groups. Control group rabbits (group 1) were subjected to anesthesia for 60 min; group 2 and 3 animals were subjected to a CO(2) pneumoperitoneum (15 or 7 mm Hg); and group 4 rabbits received 50 mg/kg pentoxifylline, followed by a 15-mm-Hg pneumoperitoneum. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid hydroperoxide, glutathione reductase and total antioxidant status were measured.

RESULTS:

Compared with group 1, a significant increase in lipid hydroperoxide levels at the end of the pneumoperitoneum and 30 min after deflation and a significant decrease in total antioxidant status 24 h after deflation were recorded in group 2. In addition, a significant increase was observed in ALT, AST and LDH levels. These changes were attenuated by low-pressure pneumoperitoneum, whereas pentoxifylline pretreatment appeared to attenuate only transaminase levels.

CONCLUSION:

Low-pressure pneumoperitoneum could attenuate ischemia/reperfusion injury induced by CO(2 )pneumoperitoneum in a rabbit model whereas pentoxifylline pretreatment appeared to attenuate only transaminase levels. Pentoxifylline did not prevent the development of oxidative stress.

PMID:
19776590
DOI:
10.1159/000237747
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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