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Mutat Res. 2009 Jul 31;668(1-2):42-53.

Fanconi anemia proteins and endogenous stresses.

Author information

1
Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH 45229, United States.

Abstract

Each of the thirteen identified Fanconi anemia (FA) genes is required for resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and melphalan. While these agents are excellent tools for understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA repair, it is uncertain whether a defect in the removal of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is the basis for the pathophysiology of FA. For example, DNA interstrand crosslinking agents induce other types of DNA damage, in addition to ICLs. Further, other DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, activate the FA pathway, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Also, FA patients display congenital abnormalities, hematologic deficiencies, and a predisposition to cancer in the absence of an environmental source of ICLs that is external to cells. Here we consider potential sources of endogenous DNA damage, or endogenous stresses, to which FA proteins may respond. These include ICLs formed by products of lipid peroxidation, and other forms of oxidative DNA damage. FA proteins may also potentially respond to telomere shortening or replication stress. Defining these endogenous sources of DNA damage or stresses is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of deficiencies for FA proteins.We propose that FA proteins are centrally involved in the response to replication stress, including replication stress arising from oxidative DNA damage.

PMID:
19774700
PMCID:
PMC2919370
DOI:
10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2009.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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