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Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2009 Sep;35(9):449-55.

Translating health care-associated urinary tract infection prevention research into practice via the bladder bundle.

Author information

1
VA Ann Arbor HSR&D Center of Excellence, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. saint@med.umich.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), a frequent health care-associated infection (HAI), is a costly and common condition resulting in patient discomfort, activity restriction, and hospital discharge delays. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) no longer reimburses hospitals for the extra cost of caring for patients who develop CAUTI. The Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality has initiated a statewide initiative, MHA Keystone HAI, to help ameliorate the burden of disease associated with indwelling catheterization. In addition, a long-term research project is being conducted to evaluate the current initiative and to identify practical strategies to ensure the effective use of proven infection prevention and patient safety practices.

OVERVIEW OF THE BLADDER BUNDLE INITIATIVE IN MICHIGAN:

The bladder bundle as conceived by MHA Keystone HAI focuses on preventing CAUTI by optimizing the use of urinary catheters with a specific emphasis on continual assessment and catheter removal as soon as possible, especially for patients without a clear indication. COLLABORATION BETWEEN RESEARChERS AND STATE WIDE PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS: A synergistic collaboration between patient safety researchers and a statewide patient safety organization is aimed at identifying effective strategies to move evidence from peer-reviewed literature to the bedside. Practical strategies that facilitate implementation of the bundle will be developed and tested using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods.

DISCUSSION:

Simply disseminating scientific evidence is often ineffective in changing clinical practice. Therefore, learning how to implement these findings is critically important to promoting high-quality care and a safe health care environment.

PMID:
19769204
PMCID:
PMC2791398
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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