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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Jan;202(1):61.e1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2009.07.041. Epub 2009 Sep 20.

Psychosocial stress during pregnancy.

Author information

1
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to identify factors associated with high antenatal psychosocial stress and describe the course of psychosocial stress during pregnancy.

STUDY DESIGN:

We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from an ongoing registry. Study participants were 1522 women receiving prenatal care at a university obstetric clinic from January 2004 through March 2008. Multiple logistic regression identified factors associated with high stress as measured by the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile stress scale.

RESULTS:

The majority of participants reported antenatal psychosocial stress (78% low-moderate, 6% high). Depression (odds ratios [OR], 9.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.5-17.0), panic disorder (OR, 6.8; 95% CI, 2.9-16.2), drug use (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-12.5), domestic violence (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-8.3), and having > or =2 medical comorbidities (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.8-5.5) were significantly associated with high psychosocial stress. For women who screened twice during pregnancy, mean stress scores declined during pregnancy (14.8 +/- 3.9 vs 14.2 +/- 3.8; P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

Antenatal psychosocial stress is common, and high levels are associated with maternal factors known to contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes.

PMID:
19766975
PMCID:
PMC2811236
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2009.07.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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