Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Cardiol. 2009 Oct 1;104(7):972-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.05.044.

Meta-analysis of prognostic value of stress testing in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

The management strategy in asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is controversial. Aortic valve replacement has significant morbidity and mortality, while there is a risk for sudden cardiac death with conservative management. There is no consensus on the prognostic value of stress testing to stratify management. A pooled analysis of studies in patients with severe AS was performed to assess the prognostic value of stress testing for adverse events, including angina, dyspnea, acute heart failure, sudden death, and symptoms requiring aortic valve replacement. A search of published research was performed using the terms "stress test" and "asymptomatic aortic stenosis." A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Data from 7 studies were included (491 patients with asymptomatic severe AS). None of the patients experienced any complications during or after stress testing. There were no sudden deaths in the patients with normal stress test results after 1 year of follow-up, while 5% with abnormal stress test results had sudden cardiac death. Overall, 52 of 253 patients (21%) with normal stress test results had adverse cardiac events, compared with 156 of 238 (66%) with abnormal stress test results (odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.21, p <0.001). In conclusion, stress testing in asymptomatic patients with severe AS is safe and identifies patients at risk for adverse cardiac events and sudden cardiac death. These data suggest that stress tests can be used for risk stratification and for deciding on the timing of aortic valve replacement in asymptomatic patients with severe AS.

PMID:
19766766
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.05.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center