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Immunity. 2009 Sep 18;31(3):425-37. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2009.08.014.

Innate cells and T helper 2 cell immunity in airway inflammation.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nbarrett@partners.org

Abstract

Activated mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils infiltrate the airways of asthmatics as a result of an overexuberant T helper 2 (Th2) cell immune response that drives the production of IgE, primes mast cells and basophils, and promotes tissue eosinophilia and mast cell hyperplasia. Recent evidence demonstrates that these innate effectors can be activated outside of this classical Th2 cell paradigm and that they have additional roles in promoting the development of innate and adaptive pulmonary inflammation. There is also an appreciation for the role of airway epithelial cells in orchestrating allergic pulmonary inflammation. Emerging data from basic research highlight the involvement of many unique pathways in the inflammation triggered by complex native allergens and microbes at the airway mucosal surface. Here, we review the role of effector cells and airway epithelial cells in augmenting and, at times, bypassing traditional Th2 cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

PMID:
19766085
PMCID:
PMC3353417
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2009.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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