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Child Dev. 2009 Sep-Oct;80(5):1403-20. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01341.x.

Correlates and consequences of spanking and verbal punishment for low-income white, african american, and mexican american toddlers.

Author information

1
Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. ljberlin@duke.edu

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence, predictors, and outcomes of spanking and verbal punishment in 2,573 low-income White, African American, and Mexican American toddlers at ages 1, 2, and 3. Both spanking and verbal punishment varied by maternal race/ethnicity. Child fussiness at age 1 predicted spanking and verbal punishment at all 3 ages. Cross-lagged path analyses indicated that spanking (but not verbal punishment) at age 1 predicted child aggressive behavior problems at age 2 and lower Bayley mental development scores at age 3. Neither child aggressive behavior problems nor Bayley scores predicted later spanking or verbal punishment. In some instances, maternal race/ethnicity and/or emotional responsiveness moderated the effects of spanking and verbal punishment on child outcomes.

PMID:
19765008
PMCID:
PMC2987237
DOI:
10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01341.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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