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Br J Gen Pract. 2009 Sep;59(566):e308-14. doi: 10.3399/bjgp09X454115.

GPs' role in the detection of psychological problems of young people: a population-based study.

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1
Research Group on Adolescent Health, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Among young people, about one in three females and one in five males report experiencing emotional distress but 65-95% of them do not receive help from health professionals.

AIM:

To assess the differences among young people who seek help and those who do not seek help for their psychological problems, considering the frequency of consultations to their GP and their social resources.

DESIGN OF STUDY:

School survey.

SETTING:

Post-mandatory school.

METHOD:

Among a Swiss national representative sample of 7429 students and apprentices (45.6% females) aged 16-20 years, 1931 young people reported needing help for a problem of depression/sadness (26%) and were included in the study. They were divided into those who sought help (n = 256) and those who did not (n = 1675), and differences between them were assessed.

RESULTS:

Only 13% of young people needing help for psychological problems consulted for that reason and this rate was positively associated with the frequency of consultations to the GP. However, 80% of young people who did not consult for psychological problems visited their GP at least once during the previous year. Being older or a student, having a higher depression score, or a history of suicide attempt were linked with a higher rate of help seeking. Moreover, confiding in adults positively influenced the rate of help seeking.

CONCLUSION:

The large majority of young people reporting psychological problems do not seek help, although they regularly consult their GP. While young people have difficulties in tackling issues about mental health, GPs could improve the situation by systematically inquiring about this issue.

PMID:
19761659
PMCID:
PMC2734378
DOI:
10.3399/bjgp09X454115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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