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J Nutr. 2009 Nov;139(11):2093-8. doi: 10.3945/jn.109.110924. Epub 2009 Sep 16.

Satiation due to equally palatable sweet and savory meals does not differ in normal weight young adults.

Author information

1
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. sanne.griffioenroose@wur.nl

Abstract

Sensory properties are greatly involved in the process of satiation. Regarding the nature of sensory signals, an important distinction can be made between sweet and savory taste. It is unclear, however, whether sweet and savory differ in their influence on satiation. Our objective was to investigate the difference between a sweet and savory taste on satiation, independent of palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition. A crossover design was used, consisting of 3 test conditions in which 2 tastes (sweet and savory) were compared. Sixty-four healthy, nonsmoking, unrestrained participants (18 males and 46 females), with a mean age of 22.3 +/- 2.4 y and a mean BMI of 21.6 +/- 1.7 kg/m(2), enrolled. Rice was used as a test meal served in either a sweet or savory version. The meals were similar in palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition. Ad libitum intake, eating rate, and changes in pleasantness and appetite during the meals were measured. Ad libitum intake did not differ between the 2 meals; participants ate a mean of 314 +/- 144 g of the sweet meal and 333 +/- 159 g of the savory meal. Eating rate (sweet, 38 +/- 14 g/min; savory, 37 +/- 14 g/min) and changes in pleasantness and appetite during the meals were similar. Homogeneous meals with a sweet or savory taste, similar in palatability, texture, energy density, and macronutrient composition, do not differ in their influence on satiation in normal weight young adults.

PMID:
19759247
DOI:
10.3945/jn.109.110924
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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