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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009 Nov;138(5):1081-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.07.045. Epub 2009 Sep 15.

Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion via right axillary artery cannulation reduces morbidity and mortality after proximal aortic surgery.

Author information

1
Clinical Research Unit, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion is a well-described neuroprotective technique used in proximal aortic surgery. This study investigated whether selective antegrade cerebral perfusion is associated with improved outcomes in both emergency and elective settings compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest alone.

METHODS:

Retrospective review was performed for all cases of proximal aortic surgery between January 2004 and May 2007. Of these 271 patients, 105 had emergency and 166 had elective operation. Selection bias was controlled using propensity scoring methods. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to model adverse outcomes as a function of selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, emergency status, and their interaction, adjusted for the propensity score. Adjusted odds ratios were formulated with 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Operative mortality occurred in 12.1% (33/271) of patients: 8.8% (18/205) in patients with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion versus 22.7% (15/66) in those with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest alone (P = .003). Temporary neurologic dysfunction occurred in 5.9% (15/255) of patients: 4.5% (9/198) in selective antegrade cerebral perfusion versus 10.5% (6/57) in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest alone (P = .09). Stroke occurred in 4.3% (11/255) of patients with no difference between groups. In the elective setting, selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was associated with a significant decrease in operative mortality compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest alone. Overall, selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was associated with shorter intensive care unit and ventilator times and fewer renal and pulmonary complications. Significant multivariable predictors of operative mortality were emergency status, previous coronary surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of selective antegrade cerebral perfusion confers a survival advantage during proximal aortic surgery that is most apparent in the elective setting. Improved resource utilization and fewer pulmonary and renal complications were observed in patients with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion.

PMID:
19758609
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.07.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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