Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Helicobacter. 2009 Oct;14(5):144-50. doi: 10.1111/j.1523-5378.2009.00705.x.

Helicobacter pylori infection significantly increases insulin resistance in the asymptomatic Japanese population.

Author information

1
Center for Preventive Medicine, Kanto Medical Center, NTT East, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Helicobacter pylori infection has been shown to contribute to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance is the pathophysiologic background of the clinical features of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and insulin resistance in a large Japanese population.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fifteen hundred ninety-eight consecutive asymptomatic subjects that underwent a complete medical survey in our institute between May 2007 and July 2008 were recruited. Cases under medication for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia, or cardiovascular diseases were excluded from the study. Cases suffering from chronic renal or liver failure were also excluded. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score was used to quantitatively estimate insulin resistance. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues (SAT) were measured by computed tomography. The association between H. pylori serostatus and HOMA-IR score was investigated by multivariate regression analysis.

RESULTS:

A total of 988 men and 119 women were eventually eligible for this cross-sectional survey. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity was significantly higher in 99 cases with insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >or=2.5) compared with 1008 cases without insulin resistance (HOMA-IR <2.5) (39.4 vs 28.7%, p = .027). There was a significant association between H. pylori serostatus and HOMA-IR score by multiple linear regression analysis (coefficients = 0.152, 95% CI = 0.058-0.246, p = .001), after adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, waist girth, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, smoking status, alcohol consumption, dietary habits, and physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Helicobacter pylori infection significantly and independently contributed to promoting insulin resistance in a large asymptomatic population.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center