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Eur J Radiol. 2011 Mar;77(3):490-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.08.025. Epub 2009 Sep 13.

The diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in soft tissue abscesses.

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1
Department of Radiology, Yüzüncü Yıl University, Van, Turkey.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in soft tissue abscesses.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Fifty patients were included in this study who were thought to have soft tissue abscess or cystic lesion as a result of clinical and radiological examinations. Localisations of the lesions were: 1 periorbital, 3 breast, 14 intraabdominal, and 32 intramuscular lesions. After other radiological examinations, DWI was performed. The signal intensity values of the lesions were evaluated qualitatively according to the hyperintensity on b-1000 DWI, using 1.5 T MR system. All of the lesions were aspirated after DWI, and detection of pus in the aspiration material was accepted as gold standard for the diagnosis of abscess.

RESULTS:

In 38 of the 50 patients, hyperintensity was obtained on diffusion-weighted images. False-positive results were maintained in 2 of these patients, and true-positive results were maintained in 36 of them. In 11 of the 50 patients, hypointensity was visualised on diffusion-weighted images. False-negative results were maintained in 3 of these patients, and true-negative results were maintained in 8 of them. An abscess which was seen on post-contrast conventional MRI could not be seen on DWI, and this was regarded as false-negative.

CONCLUSION:

The sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted images for detecting soft tissue abscesses were found to be 92% and 80%, respectively. DWI has a high diagnostic value in soft tissue abscesses, and is an important imaging modality that may be used for the differentiation of cysts and abscesses.

PMID:
19748752
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.08.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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