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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Sep;163(9):826-31. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.148.

Effect of android to gynoid fat ratio on insulin resistance in obese youth.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Exercise Biology, Blaise Pascal University, Bâtiment de Biologie B, Complexe Universitaire des Cézeaux, Aubière Cedex, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Upper body fat distribution is associated with the early development of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if an android to gynoid fat ratio is associated with the severity of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents, whereas peripheral subcutaneous fat may have a protective effect against insulin resistance.

SETTING:

The pediatric department of University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

DESIGN:

A retrospective analysis using data from medical consultations between January 2005 and January 2007.

PARTICIPANTS:

Data from 66 obese children and adolescents coming to the hospital for medical consultation were used in this study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Subjects were stratified into tertiles of android to gynoid fat ratio determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Insulin resistance was assessed by the homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index.

RESULTS:

There were no differences in weight, body mass index, and body fat percentage between tertiles. Values of HOMA-IR were significantly increased in the 2 higher tertiles (mean [SD], tertile 2, 2.73 [1.41]; tertile 3, 2.89 [1.28]) compared with the lower tertile (tertile 1, 1.67 [1.24]) of android to gynoid fat ratio (P < .001). The HOMA-IR value was significantly associated with android to gynoid fat ratio (r = 0.35; P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Android fat distribution is associated with an increased insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. An android to gynoid fat ratio based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements is a useful and simple technique to assess distribution of body fat associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance.

PMID:
19736336
DOI:
10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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