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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Sep;90(9):1462-8. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2009.03.008.

Effect of baseline spastic hemiparesis on recovery of upper-limb function following botulinum toxin type A injections and postinjection therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether baseline hand spastic hemiparesis assessed by the Chedoke-McMaster Assessment influences functional improvement after botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections and postinjection therapy.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Outpatient spasticity clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants (N=14) with spastic hemiparesis divided into 2 groups: Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Higher Function (stage> or =4, n=5) and Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Lower Function (stage=2 or 3, n=9).

INTERVENTIONS:

Upper-limb BTX-A injections followed by 6 weeks of postinjection therapy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Primary outcomes were Motor Activity Log-28 and Motor Activity Log items. Secondary outcomes were Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Motor Activity Log-Self-Report, and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Measures were assessed at baseline (preinjection), 6 weeks, 9 weeks, and 12 weeks postinjection.

RESULTS:

Primary and secondary outcomes improved significantly over time in both groups. Although no significant differences in ARAT or MAS change scores were noted between groups, Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Higher Function group demonstrated greater change on Motor Activity Log-28 (P=.013) from baseline to 6 weeks and Motor Activity Log items (P=.006) from baseline to 12 weeks compared to Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Lower Function group.

CONCLUSIONS:

BTX-A injections and postinjection therapy improved hand function and reduced spasticity for both Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Higher Function and Chedoke-McMaster Assessment Hand-Lower Function groups. Clinicians should expect to see larger gains for persons with less baseline impairment.

PMID:
19735772
PMCID:
PMC4484857
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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