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J Clin Neuromuscul Dis. 2009 Sep;11(1):1-6. doi: 10.1097/CND.0b013e3181aaa968.

Guillain-Barré syndrome after vaccination in United States: data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Food and Drug Administration Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (1990-2005).

Author information

1
Epidemiological and Outcomes Research Division, Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA. souayani@umdnj.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are isolated reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) after receiving vaccination.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the rates and characteristics of GBS after administration of vaccination in United States

METHODS:

We used data for 1990 to 2005 from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is a cooperative program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration.

RESULTS:

There were 1000 cases (mean age, 47 years) of GBS reported after vaccination in the United States between 1990 and 2005. The onset of GBS was within 6 weeks in 774 cases, >6 weeks in 101, and unknown in 125. Death and disability after the event occurred in 32 (3.2%) and 167 (16.7%) subjects, respectively. The highest number (n = 632) of GBS cases was observed in subjects receiving influenza vaccine followed by hepatitis B vaccine (n = 94). Other vaccines or combinations of vaccines were associated with 274 cases of GBS. The incidence of GBS after influenza vaccination was marginally higher in subjects <65 years compared with those >or=65 years (P = 0.09); for hepatitis vaccine, the incidence was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in the <65 group. Death was more frequent in subjects >or=65 years compared with those <65 years (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that vaccines other than influenza vaccine can be associated with GBS. Vaccination-related GBS results in death or disability in one fifth of affected individuals, which is comparable to the reported rates in the general GBS population.

PMID:
19730016
DOI:
10.1097/CND.0b013e3181aaa968
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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