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Injury. 2010 May;41(5):548-50. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2009.08.006. Epub 2009 Sep 3.

Cow-related trauma: a 10-year review of injuries admitted to a single institution.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital Drogheda, Co. Louth, Ireland. cmurphy@rcsi.ie

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Bovine-related injuries to farmers are common in rural communities. Many injuries are significant requiring hospital admission and surgery. We reviewed all cattle-related injuries admitted to a regional trauma centre over 10 years and detail the nature of the injuries.

METHOD:

A retrospective review was undertaken, using hospital inpatient coding system (HIPE) to identify patients admitted following cow-related trauma for the last 10 years. From retrieved charts mechanism of injury was identified, demographics recorded and Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) calculated based on the injuries sustained.

RESULTS:

47 patients were identified, with a median age of 53 years. 4 injuries occurred in children, and 12 in patients over 65 years old. Three-quarters of those injured were male. Kicking was the most common mechanism of injury (n=21), but charge/head-butt injuries and trampling injuries were associated with more serious injury scores. 72% of patients were admitted under Orthopaedics as their primary care team, 25% under General Surgeons, with one patient admitted medically. Mean ISS score was 6.9 (range 1-50). 41 operative interventions were performed on 30 patients during their admission. 6.3% of patients required admission to Intensive Care with a mean length of stay of 12.3 days (range 2-21 days). There was no mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Cow-related trauma is a common among farming communities and is a potentially serious mechanism of injury that appears to be under-reported in a hospital context. Bovine-related head-butt and trampling injuries should be considered akin to high-velocity trauma.

PMID:
19729160
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2009.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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