Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetologia. 2009 Nov;52(11):2299-2305. doi: 10.1007/s00125-009-1512-7. Epub 2009 Sep 2.

The clinical application of genetic testing in type 2 diabetes: a patient and physician survey.

Author information

1
Division of General Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford St, 9th floor, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. Rgrant@partners.org.
2
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Rgrant@partners.org.
3
Division of General Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford St, 9th floor, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
4
Diabetes Research Center (Diabetes Unit), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

Advances in type 2 diabetes genetics have raised hopes that genetic testing will improve disease prediction, prevention and treatment. Little is known about current physician and patient views regarding type 2 diabetes genetic testing. We hypothesised that physician and patient views would differ regarding the impact of genetic testing on motivation and adherence.

METHODS:

We surveyed a nationally representative sample of US primary care physicians and endocrinologists (n = 304), a random sample of non-diabetic primary care patients (n = 152) and patients enrolled in a diabetes pharmacogenetics study (n = 89).

RESULTS:

Physicians and patients favoured genetic testing for diabetes risk prediction (79% of physicians vs 80% of non-diabetic patients would be somewhat/very likely to order/request testing, p = 0.7). More patients than physicians (71% vs 23%, p < 0.01) indicated that a 'high risk' result would be very likely to improve motivation to adopt preventive lifestyle changes. Patients favoured genetic testing to guide therapy (78% of patients vs 48% of physicians very likely to request/recommend testing, p < 0.01) and reported that genetic testing would make them 'much more motivated' to adhere to medications (72% vs 18% of physicians, p < 0.01). Many physicians (39%) would be somewhat/very likely to order genetic testing before published evidence of clinical efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Despite the paucity of current data, physicians and patients reported high expectations that genetic testing would improve patient motivation to adopt key behaviours for the prevention or control of type 2 diabetes. This suggests the testable hypothesis that 'genetic' risk information might have greater value to motivate behaviour change compared with standard risk information.

PMID:
19727660
PMCID:
PMC3829642
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-009-1512-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center