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Biol Lett. 2010 Feb 23;6(1):30-2. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0593. Epub 2009 Sep 2.

Affective responses in tamarins elicited by species-specific music.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. snowdon@wisc.edu

Abstract

Theories of music evolution agree that human music has an affective influence on listeners. Tests of non-humans provided little evidence of preferences for human music. However, prosodic features of speech ('motherese') influence affective behaviour of non-verbal infants as well as domestic animals, suggesting that features of music can influence the behaviour of non-human species. We incorporated acoustical characteristics of tamarin affiliation vocalizations and tamarin threat vocalizations into corresponding pieces of music. We compared music composed for tamarins with that composed for humans. Tamarins were generally indifferent to playbacks of human music, but responded with increased arousal to tamarin threat vocalization based music, and with decreased activity and increased calm behaviour to tamarin affective vocalization based music. Affective components in human music may have evolutionary origins in the structure of calls of non-human animals. In addition, animal signals may have evolved to manage the behaviour of listeners by influencing their affective state.

PMID:
19726444
PMCID:
PMC2817256
DOI:
10.1098/rsbl.2009.0593
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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