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Sleep. 2009 Aug;32(8):1011-7.

Pain sensitivity in sleepy pain-free normals.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders & Research Center, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI 48202, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Past studies have shown that acute experimental reduction of time in bed in otherwise healthy, non-sleepy people leads to hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that otherwise healthy, sleepy people may also exhibit hyperalgesia relative to their non-sleepy counterparts.

DESIGN:

Between-groups sleep laboratory study.

SETTING:

Hospital-based sleep disorders center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-seven, healthy, normal participants (age 18-35 years) were recruited and categorized into sleepy and non-sleepy groups based on their average sleep latencies on a screening multiple sleep latency test (MSLT).

INTERVENTIONS:

Both groups were then allowed 8 hours time in bed, following which they underwent pain sensitivity testing (10:30 and 14:30) and sleepiness assessments by the MSLT (10:00, 12:00, 14:00, and 16:00). Pain sensitivity assessments were made by measuring finger withdrawal latencies to a radiant heat source delivering 5 different heat intensities.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

This study showed that after only one night of 8 hours time in bed, the sleepy participants continued to be sleepy and exhibited a more rapid finger withdrawal response (i.e., increased pain sensitivity) to radiant heat than non-sleepy participants.

CONCLUSION:

This suggests that sleepy individuals experience hyperalgesia in response to a painful stimulus when compared with non-sleepy individuals.

PMID:
19725252
PMCID:
PMC2717191
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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