Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2009 Dec 15;53(7):1284-8. doi: 10.1002/pbc.22247.

Prolonged acquired neutropenia in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acquired neutropenia is not uncommon in childhood. This study investigated the risk factors associated with developing prolonged acquired neutropenia.

PROCEDURE:

We reviewed 66,062 hospital admission medical records from the 5-year period January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006 to identify neutropenic patients, with and without follow-up of their neutropenic course until December 31, 2007. After excluding patients with malignancy, collagen disease, bone marrow failure, prematurity, hereditary disease, congenital neutropenia, immunodeficiency, or status post-liver transplantation, 735 admissions with acquired neutropenia were included in our study.

RESULTS:

A total of 474 patients with 735 admissions had moderate or severe neutropenia during the 5-year period. Among the 252 acquired neutropenia patients who had follow-up for at least 1 month, 226 patients recovered within 3 months, while 26 patients remained neutropenic after 3 months. Of these 26 patients, 14 recovered after 1 year. An absolute neutrophil count of <500/mm(3) (odds ratio [OR]: 13.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.90-64.41), thrombocytosis (OR: 5.76, 95% CI: 1.78-18.58), and age <1 year (OR: 4.93, 95% CI: 1.03-23.54) were associated with prolonged acquired neutropenia, as shown by multivariate logistic regression. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that neutropenia associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) was more prolonged than neutropenia associated with influenza or Epstein-Barr virus infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prolonged acquired neutropenia was associated with younger age, thrombocytosis, and CMV infection. Neutropenic infants with CMV infection may require antiviral therapy to prevent prolonged acquired neutropenia.

PMID:
19711442
DOI:
10.1002/pbc.22247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center