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Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2010 Mar;37(3):684-90. doi: 10.1016/j.ejcts.2009.07.025. Epub 2009 Aug 25.

The amounts of alpha 1 antitrypsin protein are reduced in the vascular wall of the acutely dissected human ascending aorta.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria. Thomas.Schachner@i-med.ac.at

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aneurysm and dissection of the ascending aorta carry the risk of life-threatening complications. The anti-protease alpha 1 antitrypsin plays an important role in the tissue protease - anti-protease equilibrium. We aim to investigate the molecular pathology of these diseases by differential proteomics and mass-spectrometric analysis.

METHODS:

From ascending aortic wall specimens of aneurysms, acute dissections and controls, protein amounts were analysed by the differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Significantly, different spots underwent qualitative analysis by nanospray mass spectrometry.

RESULTS:

Among the most significant differentially expressed protein spots in the DIGE analysis, the most notable protein identified by nanospray mass spectrometry was alpha 1 antitrypsin. This was significantly reduced in aneurysms and aortic dissections compared with controls (p<0.05). Western blot analysis confirmed the reduced amounts of alpha 1 antitrypsin in aortic dissections (p=0.008 vs controls) but not for aneurysms (p=0.258). By quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA level of alpha 1 antitrypsin was found to be increased in aortic dissections (p=0.035 vs controls), whereas in aneurysms a non-significant reduction of alpha 1 antitrypsin mRNA was present (p=0.123 vs controls).

CONCLUSION:

In the vascular wall of ascending aortic dissections, alpha 1 antitrypsin protein amounts are reduced compared with healthy aortas. Local alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in the human ascending aorta might lead to proteolytic damage easing aortic dissection.

PMID:
19709897
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejcts.2009.07.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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