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BMC Microbiol. 2009 Aug 26;9:180. doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-9-180.

Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli, strain LF82 disrupts apical junctional complexes in polarized epithelia.

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1
Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. wine@ualberta.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although bacteria are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), mechanisms of intestinal injury and immune activation remain unclear. Identification of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains in IBD patients offers an opportunity to characterize the pathogenesis of microbial-induced intestinal inflammation in IBD. Previous studies have focused on the invasive phenotype of AIEC and the ability to replicate and survive in phagocytes. However, the precise mechanisms by which these newly identified microbes penetrate the epithelial lining remain to be clarified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to delineate the effects of AIEC, strain LF82 (serotype O83:H1) on model polarized epithelial monolayers as a contributor to intestinal injury in IBD.

RESULTS:

Infection of T84 and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-I polarized epithelial cell monolayers with AIEC, strain LF82 led to a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance and increased macromolecular (10 kilodalton dextran) flux. Basolateral AIEC infection resulted in more severe disruption of the epithelial barrier. Increased permeability was accompanied by a redistribution of the tight junction adaptor protein, zonula occludens-1, demonstrated by confocal microscopy and formation of gaps between cells, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. After 4 h of infection of intestine 407 cells, bacteria replicated in the cell cytoplasm and were enclosed in membrane-bound vesicles positive for the late endosomal marker, LAMP1.

CONCLUSION:

These findings indicate that AIEC, strain LF82 disrupts the integrity of the polarized epithelial cell barrier. This disruption enables bacteria to penetrate into the epithelium and replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. These findings provide important links between microbes related to IBD, the intestinal epithelial cell barrier and disease pathogenesis.

PMID:
19709415
PMCID:
PMC2741472
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2180-9-180
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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