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J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2009 Aug;11(8):426-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7176.2009.00152.x.

24-hour and nighttime blood pressures in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients following morning or evening administration of olmesartan.

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1
Service of Endocrinology, Centro Médico Juaneda, Inca, Spain. santiago.tofe@ssib.es

Abstract

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows determining of the nocturnal blood pressure fall (NBPF). An NBPF below 10% (nondipper pattern) has been related to increased cardiovascular risk, and it is a common finding in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients. The authors evaluated the impact on 24-hour blood pressure, NBPF, and albuminuria of olmesartan 40 mg, administered in a morning- vs a nocturnal-based dosing scheme, in type 2 diabetic patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. Using a crossover design, 40 patients (42.1% men) received olmesartan 40 mg once daily at wake up or bedtime for 8 weeks. Patients underwent 24-hour ABPM at baseline and at weeks 8 and 16, and albumin to creatinine ratio was measured at baseline and 8 weeks. Night systolic blood pressure (BP) (P=.007) and mean BP (P=.012) were significantly reduced following the bedtime dose, compared with morning dosing. Night BP fall (%) was significantly reduced by bedtime dosing, compared with morning dosing (P=.0001). No differences were seen for urinary albumin excretion between both arms at week 8. Without affecting 24-hour BP control, night dosing of olmesartan increases nocturnal BP fall significantly more than conventional morning dosing, increasing the number of dipper diabetic hypertensive patients.

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