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Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2009;64(8):731-4. doi: 10.1590/S1807-59322009000800004.

Influence of late treatment on how chronic myeloid leukemia responds to imatinib.

Author information

1
Universidade Federal do Pará, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Belém/PA, Brazil.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In Brazil, patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase were not given first-line imatinib treatment until 2008. Therefore, there was a long period of time between diagnosis and the initiation of imatinib therapy for many patients. This study aims to compare the major molecular remission (MMR) rates of early versus late imatinib therapy in chronic phase CML patients.

METHODS:

Between May 2002 and November 2007, 44 patients with chronic phase CML were treated with second-line imatinib therapy at the Hematology Unit of the Ophir Loyola Hospital (Belém, Pará, Brazil). BCR-ABL transcript levels were measured at approximately six-month intervals using quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS:

The early treatment group presented a 60% probability of achieving MMR, while the probability for those patients who received late treatment was 40%. The probability of either not achieving MMR within one year of the initiation of imatinib therapy or losing MMR was higher in patients who received late treatment (79%), compared with patients who received early treatment (21%, odds ratio=5.75, P=0.012). The probability of maintaining MMR at 30 months of treatment was 80% in the early treatment group and 44% in the late treatment group (P=0.0005).

CONCLUSIONS:

For CML patients in the chronic phase who were treated with second-line imatinib therapy, the probability of achieving and maintaining MMR was higher in patients who received early treatment compared with those patients for whom the time interval between diagnosis and initiation of imatinib therapy was longer than one year.

KEYWORDS:

BCR-ABL; CML; Imatinib; late treatment; major molecular remission

PMID:
19690655
PMCID:
PMC2728184
DOI:
10.1590/S1807-59322009000800004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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