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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Dec 1;30(11-12):1171-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2009.04098.x. Epub 2009 Jul 20.

Diverticular disease hospital admissions are increasing, with poor outcomes in the elderly and emergency admissions.

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1
Department of Colorectal Surgery, King's College Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diverticular disease has a changing disease pattern with limited epidemiological data.

AIM:

To describe diverticular disease admission rates and associated outcomes through national population study.

METHODS:

Data were obtained from the English 'Hospital Episode Statistics' database between 1996 and 2006. Primary outcomes examined were 30-day overall and 1-year mortality, 28-day readmission rates and extended length of stay (LOS) beyond the 75th percentile (median inpatient LOS = 6 days). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent predictors of these outcomes.

RESULTS:

Between the study dates 560 281 admissions with a primary diagnosis of diverticular disease were recorded in England. The national admission rate increased from 0.56 to 1.20 per 1000 population/year. 232 047 (41.4%) were inpatient admissions and, of these, 55 519 (23.9%) were elective and 176 528 (76.1%) emergency. Surgery was undertaken in 37 767 (16.3%). The 30-day mortality was 5.1% (n = 6735) and 1-year mortality was 14.5% (n = 11 567). The 28-day readmission rate was 9.6% (n = 21 160). Increasing age, comorbidity and emergency admission were independent predictors of all primary outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diverticular disease admissions increased over the course of the study. Patients of increasing age, admitted as emergency and significant comorbidity should be identified, allowing management modification to optimize outcomes.

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