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Simul Healthc. 2009 Fall;4(3):135-42. doi: 10.1097/SIH.0b013e318196f839.

Alternative educational models for interdisciplinary student teams.

Author information

1
University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, TX, USA. jleflore@uta.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies compare instructor-modeled learning with modified debriefing to self-directed learning with facilitated debriefing during team-simulated clinical scenarios.

OBJECTIVE:

: To determine whether self-directed learning with facilitated debriefing during team-simulated clinical scenarios (group A) has better outcomes compared with instructor-modeled learning with modified debriefing (group B).

METHODS:

This study used a convenience sample of students. The four tools used assessed pre/post knowledge, satisfaction, technical, and team behaviors. Thirteen interdisciplinary student teams participated: seven in group A and six in group B. Student teams consisted of one nurse practitioner student, one registered nurse student, one social work student, and one respiratory therapy student. The Knowledge Assessment Tool was analyzed by student profession.

RESULTS:

There were no statistically significant differences within each student profession group on the Knowledge Assessment Tool. Group B was significantly more satisfied than group A (P = 0.01). Group B registered nurses and social worker students were significantly more satisfied than group A (30.0 +/- 0.50 vs. 26.2 +/- 3.0, P = 0.03 and 28.0 +/- 2.0 vs. 24.0 +/- 3.3, P = 0.04, respectively). Group B had significantly better scores than group A on 8 of the 11 components of the Technical Evaluation Tool; group B intervened more quickly. Group B had significantly higher scores on 8 of 10 components of the Behavioral Assessment Tool and overall team scores.

CONCLUSION:

The data suggest that instructor-modeling learning with modified debriefing is more effective than self-directed learning with facilitated debriefing during team-simulated clinical scenarios.

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PMID:
19680079
DOI:
10.1097/SIH.0b013e318196f839
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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