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Dig Liver Dis. 2010 May;42(5):352-8. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2009.07.011. Epub 2009 Aug 12.

Dynamics of celiac disease-specific serology after initiation of a gluten-free diet and use in the assessment of compliance with treatment.

Author information

1
Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The usefulness of celiac disease-related serology in monitoring patients on a gluten-free diet has been debated.

AIM:

To describe serologic changes over time and assess whether serology tests can predict compliance with the gluten-free diet.

METHODS:

Sera obtained at baseline and every 3 months thereafter for 1 year in 82 adult celiac disease patients were assayed for: (1) IgA antigliadin, (2) IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase, (3) IgA endomysial, (4) IgA, and (5) IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, (6) dual detection of IgA and IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptides, (7) a single assay for IgA and IgG of both anti-deamidated gliadin peptide and anti-tissue transglutaminase, and (8) IgA antiactin antibodies.

RESULTS:

At 3 months after diagnosis, most antibody assays significant decrease in mean concentrations (p<0.0001) and the percentage of positive samples (p<0.0001) with further improvement in subsequent determinations. Strictly adherents had significantly lower concentrations of antibodies (p<0.01 to p<0.00001) and smaller proportion of positive samples for IgA endomysial, IgA antiactin antibodies and IgA antigliadin (15.6%, 17.4% and 23.9%, respectively) than partially compliant. At 1 year, IgA endomysial (p<0.02), IgA antiactin antibodies (p<0.05) and anti-tissue transglutaminase (p<0.02) predicted the degree of compliance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gluten-free diet treatment produced rapid and significant qualitative and quantitative changes in celiac disease-related antibodies which may be useful for monitoring dietary compliance.

PMID:
19679520
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2009.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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