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Womens Health Issues. 2009 Sep-Oct;19(5):344-51. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2009.06.001. Epub 2009 Aug 12.

Exposure to high-risk genital human papillomavirus and its association with risky sexual practices and laboratory-confirmed chlamydia among African-American women.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. pseth@emory.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States and African-American women have the highest prevalence of high-risk HPV. This study examined exposure to high-risk HPV in African-American women and its relation to risky sexual practices and laboratory-confirmed chlamydia.

METHODS:

A sample of 665 African-American women between 18 and 29 years old, recruited from October 2002 to March 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia, completed an Audio Computer-Assisted Survey Interview assessing sociodemographics, health practices, and risky sexual practices. Participants also provided vaginal swab specimens assayed for STIs and high-risk HPV.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of high-risk HPV was 38.9%. Among women 18 to 24 years old, it was 42.4%; it was 31% among women 25 to 29 years old. Age-stratified logistic regression analyses indicated that women between the ages of 18 and 29 and 18 and 24 who had multiple male sexual partners did not use a condom during their last casual sexual encounter and tested positive for chlamydia were significantly more likely to test positive for high-risk HPV. Women 18 to 24 years old who reported having a casual or risky sexual partner were significantly more likely to test positive for high-risk HPV. No significant correlates were identified among women 25 to 29 years old.

CONCLUSIONS:

Programs should aim to educate, decrease risky sexual practices, and increase screening and treatment for STIs among women with high-risk HPV infections. HPV vaccination recommendations for young adult African-American women warrant special consideration.

PMID:
19679492
PMCID:
PMC2743976
DOI:
10.1016/j.whi.2009.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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