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Clin Cancer Res. 2009 Aug 15;15(16):5032-5039. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-3011. Epub 2009 Aug 11.

Consensus recommendations to accelerate clinical trials for neurofibromatosis type 2.

Author information

1
St. Mary's Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.
2
Hopital Beaujon, APHP, Clichy, France.
3
Children's Tumor Foundation.
4
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
5
New York University.
6
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
7
Plexxikon, Inc., Berkeley, California.
8
Nexgenix Pharmaceuticals.
9
Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
10
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
11
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.
12
University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.
13
M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
14
Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
15
Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia.
16
House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, California.
17
University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
18
National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
19
Cornell University Medical Center, New York, New York.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated primarily with bilateral schwannomas seen on the superior vestibular branches of the eighth cranial nerves. Significant morbidity can result from surgical treatment of these tumors. Meningiomas, ependymomas, and other benign central nervous system tumors are also common in NF2. The lack of effective treatments for NF2 marks an unmet medical need.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Here, we provide recommendations from a workshop, cochaired by Drs. D. Gareth Evans and Marco Giovannini, of 36 international researchers, physicians, representatives of the biotechnology industry, and patient advocates on how to accelerate progress toward NF2 clinical trials.

RESULTS:

Workshop participants reached a consensus that, based on current knowledge, the time is right to plan and implement NF2 clinical trials. Obstacles impeding NF2 clinical trials and how to address them were discussed, as well as the candidate therapeutic pipeline for NF2.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both phase 0 and phase II NF2 trials are near-term options for NF2 clinical trials. The number of NF2 patients in the population remains limited, and successful recruitment will require ongoing collaboration efforts between NF2 clinics.

PMID:
19671848
PMCID:
PMC4513640
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-3011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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