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J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A. 2009 Aug;19(4):595-8. doi: 10.1089/lap.2009.0123.

Head-motion-controlled video goggles: preliminary concept for an interactive laparoscopic image display (i-LID).

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Division of Engineering, Brown University, 2 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02965, USA. jaidlen@usasurg.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Light-weight, low-profile, and high-resolution head-mounted displays (HMDs) now allow personalized viewing, of a laparoscopic image. The advantages include unobstructed viewing, regardless of position at the operating table, and the possibility to customize the image (i.e., enhanced reality, picture-in-picture, etc.). The bright image display allows use in daylight surroundings and the low profile of the HMD provides adequate peripheral vision. Theoretic disadvantages include reliance for all on the same image capture and anticues (i.e., reality disconnect) when the projected image remains static, despite changes in head position. This can lead to discomfort and even nausea.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We have developed a prototype of interactive laparoscopic image display that allows hands-free control of the displayed image by changes in spatial orientation of the operator's head. The prototype consists of an HMD, a spatial orientation device, and computer software to enable hands-free panning and zooming of a video-endoscopic image display. The spatial orientation device uses magnetic fields created by a transmitter and receiver, each containing three orthogonal coils. The transmitter coils are efficiently driven, using USB power only, by a newly developed circuit, each at a unique frequency. The HMD-mounted receiver system links to a commercially available PC-interface PCI-bus sound card (M-Audiocard Delta 44; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA). Analog signals at the receiver are filtered, amplified, and converted to digital signals, which are processed to control the image display.

RESULTS:

The prototype uses a proprietary static fish-eye lens and software for the distortion-free reconstitution of any portion of the captured image. Left-right and up-down motions of the head (and HMD) produce real-time panning of the displayed image. Motion of the head toward, or away from, the transmitter causes real-time zooming in or out, respectively, of the displayed image.

CONCLUSIONS:

This prototype of the interactive HMD allows hands-free, intuitive control of the laparoscopic field, independent of the captured image.

PMID:
19670983
DOI:
10.1089/lap.2009.0123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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