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J Proteome Res. 2010 Jan;9(1):50-8. doi: 10.1021/pr900191p.

Liverbase: a comprehensive view of human liver biology.

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1
State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 102206, PR China.

Abstract

The Liverbase ( http://liverbase.hupo.org.cn ) integrates information on the human liver proteome, including the function, abundance, and subcellular localization of proteins as well as associated disease information. The overall objective of the Liverbase is to provide a unique public resource for the liver community by providing comprehensive functional annotation of proteins implicated in liver development and disease. The central database features are manually annotated proteins localized in or functionally associated with human liver. In this first version of Liverbase, the associated data includes the human liver proteome (6788 proteins) and transcriptome (11205 significantly expressed genes: 10224 from CHIP and 5422 from MPSS, respecively) from the Chinese human liver proteome project (CNHLPP). As a database made publicly available through the Web site, Liverbase provides browsing and searching capabilities and a compilation of external links to other databases and homepages. Liverbase enables (i) the establishment of liver GO slim with 51 nonredundant items; (ii) systematic searches for proteins within specific functional or metabolic pathways; (iii) systematic searches that aim to find the proteins that underlie common and rare liver diseases; and (iv) the integration of detailed protein annotations derived from the literature. Liverbase also contains an external links page with links to other biological databases and homepages, including GO, KEGG, pfam, SWISS-PROT, and GNF databases. Liverbase users can utilize all these information to conduct systems biology research on liver.

PMID:
19670857
DOI:
10.1021/pr900191p
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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