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J Biol Chem. 2009 Oct 9;284(41):28045-57. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M109.035329. Epub 2009 Aug 10.

LANCL2 is necessary for abscisic acid binding and signaling in human granulocytes and in rat insulinoma cells.

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  • 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biochemistry, and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV 1, Genova 16132, Italy.

Abstract

Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone regulating fundamental physiological functions in plants, such as response to abiotic stress. Recently, ABA was shown to be produced and released by human granulocytes, by insulin-producing rat insulinoma cells, and by human and murine pancreatic beta cells. ABA autocrinally stimulates the functional activities specific for each cell type through a receptor-operated signal transduction pathway, sequentially involving a pertussis toxin-sensitive receptor/G-protein complex, cAMP, CD38-produced cADP-ribose and intracellular calcium. Here we show that the lanthionine synthetase C-like protein LANCL2 is required for ABA binding on the membrane of human granulocytes and that LANCL2 is necessary for transduction of the ABA signal into the cell-specific functional responses in granulocytes and in rat insulinoma cells. Co-expression of LANCL2 and CD38 in the human HeLa cell line reproduces the ABA-signaling pathway. Results obtained with granulocytes and CD38(+)/LANCL2(+) HeLa transfected with a chimeric G-protein (G alpha(q/i)) suggest that the pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled to LANCL2 is a G(i). Identification of LANCL2 as a critical component of the ABA-sensing protein complex will enable the screening of synthetic ABA antagonists as prospective new anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic agents.

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