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Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Sep 30;135(1):34-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2009.07.017. Epub 2009 Jul 24.

Enhancement of survival of probiotic and non-probiotic lactic acid bacteria by yeasts in fermented milk under non-refrigerated conditions.

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1
Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore. chmLsq@nus.edu.sg

Abstract

The effects of yeasts on the survival of probiotic and non-probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were studied in fermented milk under non-refrigerated conditions (30 degrees C) with a view to develop ambient-stable fermented milk with live LAB. Five yeasts tested (Saccharomyces bayanus, Williopsis saturnus var. saturnus, Yarrowia lipolytica, Candida kefyr and Kluyveromyces marxianus) enhanced the survival of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (but not Streptococcus thermophilus) in a mixed yoghurt culture in yoghurt by approximately 10(2) to 10(5)-fold. Seven yeasts examined (Candida krusei, Geotrichum candidum, Pichia subpelliculosa, Kloeckera apiculata, Pichia membranifaciens, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Y. lipolytica) improved the survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in fermented milk by approximately10(3) to 10(6)-fold. W. saturnus var. saturnus enhanced the survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. rhamnosus (probiotic) and Lactobacillus reuteri by up to 10(6)-fold, but the same yeast failed to improve the survival of Lactobacillus johnsonii (probiotic), S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus in fermented milk. These results provide definitive evidence that yeasts possess stability-enhancing effects on LAB and that the specific effects of yeasts on LAB stability vary with yeasts as well as with LAB. However, the molecular mechanism of such interaction of yeasts with LAB remains to be found.

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