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Phys Med Biol. 2009 Sep 7;54(17):N375-83. doi: 10.1088/0031-9155/54/17/N01. Epub 2009 Aug 4.

Individual radiation therapy patient whole-body phantoms for peripheral dose evaluations: method and specific software.

Author information

1
U605 INSERM, Villejuif, France. IFR69, Villejuif, France. Université Paris XI, Villejuif, France. Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France.

Abstract

This study presents a method aimed at creating radiotherapy (RT) patient-adjustable whole-body phantoms to permit retrospective and prospective peripheral dose evaluations for enhanced patient radioprotection. Our strategy involves virtual whole-body patient models (WBPM) in different RT treatment positions for both genders and for different age groups. It includes a software tool designed to match the anatomy of the phantoms with the anatomy of the actual patients, based on the quality of patient data available. The procedure for adjusting a WBPM to patient morphology includes typical dimensions available in basic auxological tables for the French population. Adjustment is semi-automatic. Because of the complexity of the human anatomy, skilled personnel are required to validate changes made in the phantom anatomy. This research is part of a global project aimed at proposing appropriate methods and software tools capable of reconstituting the anatomy and dose evaluations in the entire body of RT patients in an adapted treatment planning system (TPS). The graphic user interface is that of a TPS adapted to obtain a comfortable working process. Such WBPM have been used to supplement patient therapy planning images, usually restricted to regions involved in treatment. Here we report, as an example, the case of a patient treated for prostate cancer whose therapy planning images were complemented by an anatomy model. Although present results are preliminary and our research is ongoing, they appear encouraging, since such patient-adjusted phantoms are crucial in the optimization of radiation protection of patients and for follow-up studies.

PMID:
19652292
DOI:
10.1088/0031-9155/54/17/N01
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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