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PLoS One. 2009 Jul 30;4(7):e6443. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006443.

New antibiotic molecules: bypassing the membrane barrier of gram negative bacteria increases the activity of peptide deformylase inhibitors.

Author information

1
UMR-MD1, Transporteurs Membranaires, Chimiorésistance et Drug-Design, Facultés de Médecine et de Pharmacie, IFR 88, Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the latest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound.

PMID:
19649280
PMCID:
PMC2713832
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0006443
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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