Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2010 Feb;23(1):7-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2009.04.004. Epub 2009 Aug 3.

Characteristics of adolescents presenting to a multidisciplinary clinic for polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, American Family Children's Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. mtbekx@pediatrics.wisc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize patients referred to the adolescent polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) clinic at the American Family Children's Hospital, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.

DESIGN:

Chart review of patients seen in the first 33 months for details of initial presentation, age, body mass index (BMI), menstrual pattern, clinical and laboratory features of androgen excess, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia.

SETTING:

Multidisciplinary clinic for adolescents with PCOS at the American Family Children's Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adolescent girls with PCOS.

RESULTS:

Seventy patients (84% Caucasian) presented with an average age at referral of 16.2 years (range 11-22 y). Eighty four percent had a BMI > the 85(th) percentile and 70% had a BMI > 95(th) percentile. Menstrual pattern was quite varied, with some patients having primary amenorrhea, and over 50% experiencing hirsutism. There were 3 cases of type 2 diabetes, and over half of the patients had elevated fasting insulin levels and low HDL levels.

CONCLUSION:

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a complex and heterogeneous disorder that requires multidisciplinary expertise. Knowing the unique features of the adolescent with PCOS and metabolic risks should permit earlier intervention with intensive counseling and medical therapy to address current health concerns and prevent future co-morbidities.

PMID:
19648034
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpag.2009.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center