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J Anim Breed Genet. 2009 Jun;126(3):242-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0388.2008.00779.x.

Role of selection and inbreeding on the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sinclair swine.

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1
Department of Animal Biotechnology, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV 89557, USA. lgomezraya@cabnr.unr.edu

Abstract

This paper reports the quantitative analysis of the historical database of a herd of Sinclair swine affected by cutaneous malignant melanoma. The herd was under partial and non-systematic selection for melanoma susceptibility (animals having at least one tumour during the first 6 weeks of life). Weighted selection differentials for the number of tumours at birth and the number of tumours at 6 weeks were generally positive and between -0.43 and 4.76 tumours for the number of tumours at 6 weeks. Estimates of the heritability for number of tumours at birth and at 6 weeks using 1934 animals were 0.27 (+/-0.03) and 0.25 (+/-0.03), respectively. The estimate of the genetic correlation between these two traits was 0.95 (+/-0.03). Genetic trends were positive for the number of tumours at birth and at 6 weeks. In spite of positive selection differentials and a moderate heritability, there was a negative phenotypic trend in the number of tumours. Natural selection might be acting in a direction opposite to artificial selection in the Sinclair herd. The slopes of the regression of the number of tumours at birth, at 6 weeks, and melanoma susceptibility on individual inbreeding coefficients were non-significant, indicating no evidence of dominance. The number of live-born pigs was lower in litters from parents susceptible to the disease (p < 0.01).

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