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Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2009 Oct;9(10):1325-33. doi: 10.1517/14712590903193051.

Fibrinogen concentrate--a potential universal hemostatic agent.

Author information

1
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesiology, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. chfen@dadlnet.dk

Erratum in

  • Expert Opin Biol Ther. 2010 Feb;10(2):299.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human fibrinogen concentrates have been commercially available for decades for substitution therapy in hypofibrinogenemia, dysfibrinogenemia and afibrinogenemia. Accumulating new data suggest that fibrinogen plays a critical role in achieving and maintaining hemostasis, particularly in patients suffering from acquired fibrinogen deficiency during massive bleeding, where benefit from early intervention with fibrinogen concentrate appears to be important.

OBJECTIVE/METHODS:

This work focuses on pasteurized fibrinogen concentrate, with special emphases on product characteristics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, laboratory monitoring, dosing, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability. Future clinical and laboratory perspectives on fibrinogen are discussed and outlined.

RESULTS/CONCLUSION:

Pasteurized fibrinogen concentrate is derived from human plasma. Its half life is 2.7 days in patients with congenital fibrinogen deficiency. For congenital and acquired deficiency in vivo recovery rates vary from 60% to 109%. Reportedly, administration of pasteurized fibrinogen in patients with congenital deficiency is efficacious. Acquired deficiency of fibrinogen appears to be an early event in seriously bleeding patients, preceding critical levels of platelets or other coagulation factors. Experimental animal studies, as well as clinical observations suggest a beneficial role of early substitution with fibrinogen in management of critical traumatic and surgical bleeds. Pasteurized fibrinogen concentrate is well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of adverse thrombo-embolic events.

PMID:
19645632
DOI:
10.1517/14712590903193051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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