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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2009 Aug;124(2):602-11. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181addbbd.

A consecutive case review of orbital blowout fractures and recommendations for comprehensive management.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan. h-yano@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The orbital blowout fracture is a common facial injury, but full consensus has not been reached regarding its optimal management. The authors retrospectively explored consecutive cases of blowout fractures and proposed new recommendations for treatment.

METHODS:

Two hundred eight newly registered patients were selected from the database of Nagasaki University Hospital over the past 5 years. One hundred nine patients in the authors' department were then reviewed regarding computed tomographic classification of fracture types, preoperative complaints, and outcomes.

RESULTS:

Of the 208 patients reviewed, 43 underwent surgical repair: 37 for diplopia and 14 for enophthalmos, including eight patients who were treated for both conditions. Regarding floor fractures, the punched-out type fracture was the most common, but the burst type was associated with the highest likelihood of undergoing surgery. For medial wall fractures, the punched-out type dominated, but the overall operative incidence was lower than that observed for the floor fractures. For diplopia, more than half of the operations were performed within 2 weeks, but only two cases were performed within 3 days. For enophthalmos, over 60 percent of operations were carried out after 1 month. Two cases, later discovered to involve muscle strangulation, continued to demonstrate residual diplopia in ordinary use, and two patients continued to show enophthalmos. However, overall outcomes were considered satisfactory.

CONCLUSIONS:

If computed tomographic findings disclose a linear fracture with muscular strangulation, urgent surgery must be performed. However, for linear fractures without impaction of the muscle, or punched-out or burst type fractures, close observation for days may be appropriate. In addition, surgical intervention can be performed electively when diplopia persists for several days of observation.

PMID:
19644280
DOI:
10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181addbbd
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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