Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2010 Jan;49(1):60-5. doi: 10.1177/0009922809342460. Epub 2009 Jul 30.

Preterm premature rupture of membranes: clinical outcomes of late-preterm infants.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-0587, USA. jfmateus@utmb.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine gestational age-specific neonatal outcomes of late preterm infants delivered as a consequence of premature rupture of membranes (PROM).

METHODS:

Retrospective cohort study of infants born to women delivered electively due to preterm PROM between 34(0/7) and 36(6/7) weeks of gestation. Neonatal outcomes were compared between those delivered at 34(0/7) to 34( 6/7) weeks, at 35(0/7) to 35(6/7) weeks, and at 36( 0/7) to 36(6/7) weeks.

RESULTS:

192 infants were identified. The 34(0/7) to 34(6/7) week infants had significantly higher neonatal intensive care admission rate (72.5%) compared to those at 35( 0/7) to 35(6/7) weeks (22.8%) and at 36 to 36(6/7) weeks (17.8%) (P < .05). Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome was significantly higher at 34(0/7) to 34(6/7) weeks (35.4%) compared with 35(0/7) to 35(6/7) week and 36(0/7) to 36( 6/7) week infants (10.5% and 4.1%; P < .05). The longest hospitalization occurred in the 34(0/7) to 34(6/7) week infants (248.5 +/- 20.0 hours).

CONCLUSION:

Substantial short-term morbidity occurred in late preterm infants. The greatest number of complications affected infants born at 34(0/7) to 34(6/7) weeks.

PMID:
19643979
DOI:
10.1177/0009922809342460
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center