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FASEB J. 2009 Nov;23(11):3790-807. doi: 10.1096/fj.09-132621. Epub 2009 Jul 29.

Enhanced DNA binding capacity on up-regulated epidermal wild-type p53 in vitiligo by H2O2-mediated oxidation: a possible repair mechanism for DNA damage.

Author information

1
Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, Department of Biomedical Sciences/Centre for Skin Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK.

Abstract

Vitiligo is characterized by a patchy loss of inherited skin color affecting approximately 0.5% of individuals of all races. Despite the absence of the protecting pigment and the overwhelming evidence for hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative stress in the entire epidermis of these patients, there is neither increased photodamage/skin aging nor a higher incidence for sun-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Here we demonstrate for the first time increased DNA damage via 8-oxoguanine in the skin and plasma in association with epidermal up-regulated phosphorylated/acetylated p53 and high levels of the p53 antagonist p76(MDM2). Short-patch base-excision repair via hOgg1, APE1, and polymerasebeta DNA repair is up-regulated. Overexpression of Bcl-2 and low caspase 3 and cytochrome c levels argue against increased apoptosis in this disease. Moreover, we show the presence of high epidermal peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) levels via nitrotyrosine together with high nitrated p53 levels. We demonstrate by EMSA that nitration of p53 by ONOO(-) (300 x 10(-6) M) abrogates DNA binding, while H(2)O(2)-oxidized p53 (10(-3) M) enhances DNA binding capacity and prevents ONOO(-)-induced abrogation of DNA binding. Taken together, we add a novel reactive oxygen species to the list of oxidative stress inducers in vitiligo. Moreover, we propose up-regulated wild-type p53 together with p76(MDM2) as major players in the control of DNA damage/repair and prevention of photodamage and nonmelanoma skin cancer in vitiligo.

PMID:
19641144
DOI:
10.1096/fj.09-132621
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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