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Curr Med Res Opin. 2009 Sep;25(9):2311-6. doi: 10.1185/03007990903162465.

Comparison of body weight and clinical-parameter changes following the treatment of plaque psoriasis with biological therapies.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatological Sciences, Physiotherapy Unit, Firenze, Italy. francesca.prignano@unifi.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study is a retrospective analysis evaluating the presence of comorbidities, as well as the changes in body weight and clinical parameters in psoriasis patients following treatment with anti-TNF-alpha agents and with the anti-CD11a agent efalizumab.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

A total of 268 patients affected by chronic plaque psoriasis, and receiving systemic monotherapy with efalizumab, etanercept, or infliximab, were included. The follow-up period was 2, 4 and 6 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Clinical data including age, gender, weight, type and severity of psoriasis and age of onset were collected. Severity of psoriasis was assessed according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and body surface area (BSA).

RESULTS:

Hypertension and hyperlipidaemia were the comorbidities present with the higher frequency in our group of patients. PASI score was reduced by between 43.8 and 52% in all treatment groups. No relevant blood chemistry changes were observed following therapy, with the exception of a decrease in neutrophils and an increase in leukocyte numbers reported in the efalizumab and etanercept groups. Interestingly, after 6 months of therapy, the weight of the patients remained unvaried in those taking efalizumab (-0.05%) but was moderately increased in the etanercept (+0.72%) and in infliximab groups (+0.3%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study shows that there were clinically significant differences in weight gain effects between efalizumab and anti-TNF-alpha agents in psoriatic patients. The changes in body weight gain increase did not reach statistical significance, although there is a trend towards this, and this may be due to the relatively small number of patient studied.

PMID:
19635043
DOI:
10.1185/03007990903162465
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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