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Crit Care Med. 2010 Jan;38(1):84-92. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181b08cdb.

Ultrasound assessment of antibiotic-induced pulmonary reaeration in ventilator-associated pneumonia.

Author information

1
Réanimation Polyvalente Pierre Viars, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare lung reaeration measured by bedside chest radiography, lung computed tomography, and lung ultrasound in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia treated by antibiotics.

DESIGN:

Computed tomography, chest radiography, and lung ultrasound were performed before (day 0) and 7 days following initiation of antibiotics.

SETTING:

A 26-bed multidisciplinary intensive care unit in La Pitié-Salpêtrière hospital (University Paris-6).

PATIENTS:

: Thirty critically ill patients studied over the first 10 days of developing ventilator-associated pneumonia.

INTERVENTIONS:

: Antibiotic administration.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Computed tomography reaeration was measured as the additional volume of gas present within both lungs following 7 days of antimicrobial therapy. Lung ultrasound of the entire chest wall was performed and four entities were defined: consolidation; multiple irregularly spaced B-lines; multiple abutting ultrasound lung "comets" issued from the pleural line or a small subpleural consolidation; normal aeration. For each of the 12 regions examined, ultrasound changes were measured between day 0 and 7 and a reaeration score was calculated. An ultrasound score >5 was associated with a computed tomography reaeration >400 mL and a successful antimicrobial therapy. An ultrasound score <-10 was associated with a loss of computed tomography aeration >400 mL and a failure of antibiotics. A highly significant correlation was found between computed tomography and ultrasound lung reaeration (Rho = 0.85, p < .0001). Chest radiography was inaccurate in predicting lung reaeration.

CONCLUSIONS:

Lung reaeration can be accurately estimated with bedside lung ultrasound in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia treated by antibiotics. Lung ultrasound can also detect the failure of antibiotics to reaerate the lung.

PMID:
19633538
DOI:
10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181b08cdb
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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